BizDK.com provides useful information on business site including business ethics, community development, environment, franchises, government & trade, management, self-employment, women's business.  
 
Home     |     Get Listed Here
 

Posts Tagged ‘Economics’

Womens Business Grants For Your Business Start Up

Wednesday, November 11th, 2009

These are naturally bright and enterprising, business-minded young women, who have had the privilege of a college education, or business degree, and are likely to be at an advantage to navigating their way round the legal mumbo jumbo of the government grant application. But what about some of the simpler gals?

You don not necessarily have to be a social genius or corporate ladder climber to advantage the benefits of women business grants though. Nor do are you required to pursue any business in what is generally considered the “professional” field. Any American taxpaying citizen over the age of eighteen of common intelligence could acquire free government money to open a hot dog stand if they wanted to, particularly, American women.

Each year the government awards thousands of women, who are eligible to qualify, with generous cash funds through small business grants to establish various types of businesses. While many do pursue high finance and professional ventures, a great portion of the female applicants are striving for smaller “mom and pop” types of businesses, and receiving a lot of free government money to do it.

The government is equally as willing to hand over a few thousand dollars for you to start a family restaurant, neighborhood grocery store, day care center, bakery, dance studio, or corner tavern as they are to finance a law firm, medical center, or realty company. Business is business and the United States economy depends on every single business, large or small. Statistics have also proven to Uncle Sam that investing in the ladies is more often than not a sure bet, as we have nearly double the success rate in business than men.

The Economics of Trust

Wednesday, October 28th, 2009

In our world today, the trading system is based mainly on fiat money. Fiat money means that the currencies in dollar notes are declared to be legal tender by governments. For example a Singapore ten dollar note means that the Singapore government accepts a $10 payment for goods and services within Singapore. This same $10 bill can also be used to pay off $10 worth of debt incurred in Singapore. Therefore all the dollar bills of the respective countries are always imprinted with the country stamp as a watermark. This watermark serves as a form of trust that a dollar bill is legal tender by that country. This is the reason why when the exact same dollar bill that does not have the watermark is considered to be counterfeit.

During the period of barter trading, when a person decides to trade his wheat for another person’s meat, the wheat trader trusts that he will get the meat that he wants. The issue of trust is even more relevant for fiat money. People only use money to invest or buy something provided that they trust the product or service to a certain degree. Why there is a trust is really because there is a provision of value.

The currency that we use is worth a value because the government of that country will honor its value of use. When the Japanese left Singapore after World War 2, the banana notes in circulation became worthless because the Japanese will not honor the banana notes’ value of use for trade in Singapore. When a company does not pay up its debts on time, it is an act of distrust. When debts accumulate, the company will eventually go bankrupt. It is similar in other circumstances as well. When the employee embezzles, he will be terminated immediately even though that employee may be a talented person who is capable of generating huge sales for the company. Without trust, money created and earned will soon be destroyed.

The currency that we use is worth a value because the government of that country will honor its value of use. When the Japanese left Singapore after World War 2, the banana notes in circulation became worthless because the Japanese will not honor the banana notes’ value of use for trade in Singapore. When a company does not pay up its debts on time, it is an act of distrust. When debts accumulate, the company will eventually go bankrupt. It is similar in other circumstances as well. When the employee embezzles, he will be terminated immediately even though that employee may be a talented person who is capable of generating huge sales for the company. Without trust, money created and earned will soon be destroyed.

Copyright © BizDK.com, Inc. All Rights Reserved.